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LLDC Winter Festival Crafts Workshops

Between 19th to 23rd January 2023 you can register for craft workshops teaching different Pastoral crafts.
In these workshops you will get a chance to learn the craft hands-on under the guidance of Master Artisans of the Craft.

Rabaari Embroidery

Rabaari men and women lead a nomadic life in search of pasture with their sheep and their camels. Says a Rabaari woman who has spent most of her life out in the open: Animals are our life. If our animals are happy, we are happy. Four-five families, we travel together with our belongings in a joond, caravan. We halt for the night; in the morning, we eat some rotla and set out again. If the grass is good we may stay five to six days, otherwise it is a different place every day. Today's generation is not very happy to be wandering like this in the heat and rain and cold. There are many difficulties. If our animals get into a farmer's field, we get shouted at. Sometimes they beat us and we also have to pay a fine. And where is the land for grazing? Things are changing... Embroidery has a large presence in the lives of the Rabaari. Clothing of men, women and children is embroidered. As are household items such as toran, ochhaad, latkaniya, chaakda and theli. Camels are also adorned with embroidered covers.

Date : 20th to 23rd January, 2023
Place : Sanjha Bazaar

Wool Spinning

Wool spinning is a primary tradition and skill available with elderly Rabari women in Kutch. Women of other communities like Darbar and Meghwal also acquired the skill of hand spinning. The hand spinning is mostly done with the cleaned and carded wool available in the form of Puni or Lefa. The women were doing the wool cleaning and carding process in the past, but now they receive the clean wool for which they work. They use regular “Doshi” charkha or Yarwada chakra. The name Doshi is derived from the word used for elderly women in Gujarati language. The hand spinning of wool on Charkha is a skill and labor both. The women can spin from 100 to 500 grams as per their speed and quality.

Date : 20th to 23rd January, 2023
Place : Sanjha Bazaar

Ply Split Braiding

Ply-split braiding is a technique where one twisted cord ("splitter") passes through another twisted cord or cords splitting the plies of the latter cords. This is unlike weaving or many forms of braiding where cloth is formed by threads interlacing in an over-under sequence. Pattern is formed by cord color, and splitting order. Ply-split braiding is an ancient art that is practiced for making elaborate camel girths and other animal regalia of hand-spun goat hair, wool or sometimes cotton in northwestern India. The craft form is languishing in Kutch and only practiced by a handful of practitioners from Meghwal or Rabari communities.

Date : 20th to 23rd January, 2023
Place : Sanjha Bazaar

Weaving ( Himachal Pradesh )

Weave on the small Khaddi frame looms. These looms are traditionally used to weave the intricate borders of the iconic Kullu Caps.

Date : 20th to 23rd January, 2023
Place : Sanjha Bazaar

Lambani Embroidery (Telangana)

Lambanis are semi-nomadic people who reside mostly in Southern and Middle India, also known as “Banjaras”. As with many tribal groups, especially those with a nomadic heritage, there is a modern tendency to either isolate or assimilate. The Banjara women, however, are holding steadfast to their ancient mode of dress, which is perhaps the most colorful and elaborate of any tribal group in India. The Lambani women practice a unique mirror and embroidery craft, which they mostly use for making their own traditional dresses or for giving to their daughters for their weddings.

Date : 19th to 23rd January, 2023
Place : Sanjha Bazaar


Namda

Namda is a unique wool craft of Kutch. The artisans create felted wool works by pressing and hand weaving local desi sheep wool into motifs and designs. Artisans traditionally produced namda khongir, padchi, and jeen, to cover the backs of horses and camels. Namda is also used to make floor coverings and prayer mats. Though a market remains for these traditional products and contemporary interpretations, only three Namda artisan families continue the craft. Kachchh Namda artisans are from the Mansuri community living in Gagodar, Mundra and Todiya.

Date : 19th to 23rd January, 2023
Place : Sanjha Bazaar


Macramé ( Rajashthan )

Traditional craft of hand knotting indigenous wool yarns into intricate products under the guidance of Craft artisans from Rajasthan

Date : 19th to 23rd January, 2023
Place : Sanjha Bazaar


Knitting ( Himachal Pradesh )

Age old craft of knitting indigenous wool to make vibrant headbands and scarves under the guidance of master craft persons from Himachal Pradesh.

Date : 19th to 23rd January, 2023
Place : Sanjha Bazaar


 

LLDC Craft Museum

At & Post : Ajarakhpur, Tal. Bhuj-Kutch (Guj.)

Contact :  +91 8980329090 / 02832-229090

Email :  [email protected]

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